Rebeca Rangel / Senior Vice President, Community Affairs Manager, Bank of the West

Rebeca Rangel joined Bank of the West in 2005. Rangel is responsible for the Bank’s community relations efforts, as well as its multi-million dollar corporate philanthropy program. Her work strategically advances Bank of the West’s $75 billion community support goal and Community Reinvestment Act objectives. Prior to joining Bank of the West, Rangel served as a Legislative Assistant to then Congresswoman Hilda L. Solis in Washington D.C. where she developed the legislative strategy for a broad portfolio of domestic and international issues. Rangel has provided consulting and research assistance to the National Council of La Raza, the Greenlining Institute, and microfinance institutions such as Accion USA and Pro Mujer-Mexico. Rangel holds a bachelor’s degree in Urban Studies from Stanford University, a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and is a Pacific Coast Banking School graduate.

1. What motivates and inspires you?

I am indebted to my parents, who experienced severe hardships and circumstances that did not allow them to achieve their own true potential, but raised me and five siblings with an abundance of love and constantly stressing the importance of an education, so that we could maximize the full breadth of our potential.

2. Why do you support LCF?

I support LCF because giving matters. It is important for Latinos, as a community, to build off of our familial generosity and strategically invest in our nonprofit organizations and political process. LCF works to advance philanthropic habits in our community, while providing meaningful support to Latino lead and serving nonprofits.

3. What issues are you passionate about?

The sexual exploitation and abuse of our young boys and girls and women breaks my heart. As a society, we have a challenging time confronting the realities of this modern day slavery and forced prostitution; as families, we also have a challenging time acknowledging the incidence of sexual abuse. In my lifetime, I would like to work toward making these atrocities higher risk, less profitable engagements for the exploiters. However, currently I am extensively involved with education, microfinance and mental health organizations providing valuable services that improve the fabric of our local communities.

4. How have you benefited from your relationship with LCF?

LCF builds community. I value being part of LCF because of the network and causes it unites.

5. Why is giving back to the community important to you?

Giving back to the community makes me tick. At the end of the day, if we are not going to leave the world a better place, then what’s the point?

6. How do you spend your free time?

I spend my free time as a gym rat, catching up on sleep or cramming for book club. I love spending time with my family and watching my nephews, niece and god-daughters grow up.

Mario P. Diaz / Vice President, Community Affairs Rep., Wells Fargo, SF Bay Region

Mario P. Diaz is a third generation Californian of Mexican descent. A graduate from the University of California at Berkeley with a Bachelors degree in Spanish/Portuguese literature and the Bay Area has been his home since 1976. Since the fall of 1989, Mario has held several positions within the Wells Fargo Foundation and currently manages the contributions programs for the San Francisco Bay Area region. Mario is currently the Board Co-Chair for The Mexican Museum. He has served on the boards of Arriba Juntos, Northern California Grant makers, Project Open Hand, Latino Community Foundation and the National AIDS Memorial Grove, all in San Francisco. He continues to serve on several other Advisory boards in the region. His life goal is to volunteer with non-profits and projects that focus and benefit the Latino, the Lesbian Gay Bi-Sexual Transgender communities and environmental animal friendly causes and weaving in a mentoring role when able to.

1. What motivates and inspires you?

Community visionaries always leave a long-lasting impression. Individuals who decided to take action and recruit others in common to take on an issue or issues, be it, homelessness, elderly or ill homebound individuals so that their lives are improved. They motivate me to pick a cause or join theirs.

2. Why do you support LCF?

As a former board of trustee, the reason I became involved and supportive was the mission of LCF. Being a proud Californiano of Mexican descent and growing up in a home where the Mexican culture was weaved into our daily life, I feel special to have such a colorful background that I can celebrate. Giving back to my community, mi gente, is a priority for me and I wish that more Latinos would support more causes and programs that specifically focus on the Latino community. Volunteering is a selfless act and it can be very calming at the same time from our daily work schedule.

3. What issues are you passionate about?

Education is a number one priority. Animal and land conservation issues are becoming more of a focus for me as well.

4. How have you benefited from your relationship with LCF?

I have been privileged to sit alongside other professionals with larger credentials and to brainstorm with them for the greater good. We may not see each other every month but when the annual event happens, it is like a reunion and if I am lucky, I get to meet some new Latino professionals that have given back as well. Makes me feel very proud to see what we can do as a community.

5. Why is giving back to the community important to you?

I feel good when I am able to write a check for a donation that I am supportive of.

6. How do you spend your free time?

I spend my time relaxing and gardening, trying to make my green thumb greener. I enjoy socializing as long as it is not a work related event. Trips with friends I don’t see often or just breaking bread with close friends to catch up on their lives, etc. I enjoy a good feeling movie at home, too.